Leech socks and the Lipad mud volcano

With leech socks, and provided gumboots by the Tabin Wildlife Resort, Sabah,  I visit the amazing Lipad mud volcanoes which are changing constantly with their burping and bubbling. Yet again on this trip to Malaysian Borneo I go out of my comfort zone and climb the Wildlife Department’s observation tower which is about 20 metres high. I would have loved to have spent more time up there, but another small group of came and were not respectful about keeping quiet – of course no animals or birds will visit with them in the area so we, my guide and I, don’t stay as long as we had expected.

a pygmy elephant has been along the track before us
a pygmy elephant has been along the track before us

It seems the local wildlife love the minerals they get in this mud volcano: it’s a 3 to 12 metre mound of mud and clay that has been forced up through other sediments. I’m told the mud is formed when volcanic gasses dissolve in the hot ground water and interact with the igneous rocks a few metres below the surface. A reminder that Borneo is on the edge of the Pacific Ring of Fire I suspect.

This sticky mixture dries to a solid, crumbly, mud while a more liquidly-mobile mud of the highly saline mud slowly oozes up; it acts as a mineral salt-lick for many animals, including birds – the only creatures to visit while we were there. My guide also shows me different footprints in the mud, mainly mouse deer, pigs and some elephant prints which are easy to spot.

Evidently the pH level here is quite alkaline (averaging 8.0) which means few plants grow in the immediate area. I rub some onto my face: ‘No, no.’ says Palin, ‘just use the very fresh new mud. There might be urine in that older area.’ Oh well.use IMG_8702

Walking back along the muddy 6 or 7 hundred metre Mud Volcano Trail we see more pygmy elephant footprints and manure but they’re not fresh. We also hear a frog, a male Bornean tree-hole frog that exploits the acoustic properties of cavities in tree trunks or vines. The tiny creature uses the partially water-filled holes to increase its voice and chance of finding a mate. He then uses the watery hole as a safe egg hatchery.

As dusk falls we walk back towards the resort; a good time hear the evening bird song, and I also ask about a funny noise I hear in my chalet-type unit. ‘It sounds like a puppy learning to bark’ I say, ‘it’s not like other geckos I’ve heard but suspect it is one.’ My assumptions are correct – it is the ‘barking gecko’. I’m also sure it’s one of the many creatures carved on the beautiful totem-like poles around the dining room and reception.

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The two nights and three days go way too fast at the Tabin Wildlife Resort and I’m out on day and night safaris on open trucks as well as walking ones with my guide, Palin, who tells me he was named by a British friend of his family.

Arriving back in time for dinner it’s then onto the first of my two night trips. Driving down the road that separates the palm oil plantations and the native bush we see, or rather our eagle-eyed guides see things for us. With one on the back of the vehicle and other in the cab with the driver, they point out many owls, the Palm Civets, and the Leopard Cat – all obviously finding plenty to eat. So much for oil plantations being sterile.

A huge group of about 80 piglets run down the road in front of us briefly before running back into the forest: it seems they often form these herds which are called a ‘sounder’ of pigs – a term given to a group of wild pigs.

Not happy with my photos from the first night safari I leave my camera behind on the second day: breaking the number one rule for all photographers to always keep your camera close – more will be revealed in next week’s post!

 

PS: I never even saw a leech in my eight-weeks in Malaysian Borneo! 🙂

Author: Heather - the kiwi travel writer

Nomadic travel-writer, photographer, author & blogger. See more on http://kiwitravelwriter.com and Amazon for my books (heather hapeta)