Arras, France & Wellington, New Zealand are connected by tunnels!

IMG_3441Just around the corner from my Wellington, apartment is New Zealand’s national war museum and carillon (1932) and tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

For much of my time in the city it’ been covered with scaffolding and red material – making it very easy to spot my place when I flew in or out of Wellington Airport. Restored and quake-proofed, that has now been removed and by April 25th 2015 (ANZAC day) a new park will spread out in front of it – completing the dreams of the earlier designers.

Pukeahu National War Memorial Park will soon be built on the Mt Cook Hill (Pukeahu) where a ‘cut and cover trench’ has been created and it’s on top of this ‘tunnel’ that the green space and parade ground will be created. See more photos here 

A historical area of Wellington, the hill was a major military space and the Army Reserves, and the Navy still have a presence here: many  1800 artefacts were found during the excavation.

Arras Tunnel opened 5 weeks ahead of schedule (29th Sept. 2015) and I attended the official opening and, along with  many other Wellingtonians, walked through its 130 metres.

The name comes from the 1916 wartime work of some 300 New Zealand miners in the French town of the same name. Some 4,300 metres of tunnels were dug, but  it wasn’t until the 1990s that the tunnels  were rediscovered.

A museum, La Carriere Wellington, providing access to the tunnels opened in Arras in 2008. So  Wellington New Zealand and Arras, France are really connected by tunnels!