Category: New Zealand

Water around the world – and waka, birds and mermaids

Water around the world – and waka, birds and mermaids

Really busy right now so instead of words here is a photo-based blog  of water from around the world – well not all over the world, just some that were already web-sized and still on my laptop.

China, India, Wellington and Christchurch, New Zealand and Florida too – which is where the mermaids are to be found.

Waitangi Day and a hangi at the Wharewaka in Wellington

Waitangi Day and a hangi at the Wharewaka in Wellington

The 6th of February – Waitangi Day – is New Zealand’s most important national holiday and I have a  hangi at the Wharewaka. 

It’s the day our founding document the Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840. For many of us it’s a day of celebration, and commemoration. (read more I’ve written about the day here)

The day  started  for me at 4 o’clock in the morning when I went down to the Wellington waterfront to watch a hangi being prepared on the edge of Whairepo (stingray Lagoon,  in front of the Wharewaka.

However, for the men cooking the hangi it had started at 2 a.m. I hadn’t been there very long when to the dismay of all , the automatic  sprinkler system to water the lawns began pumping out litres of water – not good when you have a fire going.

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The fire of course is essential for cooking the food and it became scramble to protect the flames which were heating, not volcanic stones as my husband used, but pieces of iron which are also great heat conductors.

Of course a great hangi master saved the fire and the food emerged after 3 hours – a great 10am breakfast for me.

 

Here are my photos which tell the story from my arrival until I had the food at about 10 a.m.

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Some background about this building

Wharewaka o Poneke opened on Waitangi Day 2011 – and I was there – and during the dawn opening, Wellington’s Mayor, Celia Wade-Brown, said

“It’s a building you couldn’t see anywhere else in the world. Taranaki Whanui ki Te Upoko o Te Ika have delivered Wellington a wonderful asset that reminds us all of their place in the city – their history on the waterfront and their future as well.”

Here are some photos I took at the opening – just a few months after I moved to Wellington, NZ

Sir Ngatata Love, chairman of the Wharewaka o Poneke Charitable Trust, said he was excited to see the Wharewaka open. “This has been planned since the 1990s and I’m delighted we’re now able to bring waka culture to Wellington’s waterfront.”

The outside of the building is based on a korowai (cloak), which symbolises mana and prestige, and mirrors the traditional sails of the waka fleet.

Finally, those of you who follow me on social know the wharewaka  and lagoon is where my U3A group meets for our Monday morning walks.

City hikes in Wellington – my Monday morning walk

If you have followed me  you will know I take city hikes in Wellington – my monday morning walk, and often post photos about that day’s walk. Here is today’s #mondaymorningwalk – my last in Wellington for six weeks, the next one will be in #India.

we took the #20 bus to the top and wandered down. Enjoy the slideshow of our morning.

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Where is New Zealand on the map? It’s disappeared!

I often wonder where is New Zealand on the map – because sometimes, quite often, New Zealand is not on the map – it’s disappeared completely!

New Zealand not on the map – not many people noticed!

It seems I’m not the only one to ask that question – in fact, recently a world map was shown to many in Britain who were asked ‘what’s missing?‘ It seems, according to this news snippet in the local newspaper (Dominion Post) that many of the Brits did not notice New Zealand had apparently sunk below the sea.

So, why is New Zealand left off maps? I wondered is it our size – and checked other island countries to see where we compare sizewise.

Japan – which is on the map – is 377 915 km.²

New Zealand – not on the map – is 268,000 km.²

And, the UK, smaller than New Zealand, at 243 610 km² is on the map

And even tiny Tasmania, the island at the bottom of Australia, weighing in at only 68,401 km² is also on the map. Seems many cartographers need to get a little perspective on their drawings.

So, let me show you where New Zealand is on this globe – a photo I took at the Canterbury Museum, in Christchurch, New Zealand: that’s us, to the right, and a little south of, Australia , which is about a four hours flight away – if you were wondering.

As you can see, New Zealand is directly above Antarctica and which is why Christchurch, New Zealand has for many years been the jumping off place, the gateway, for most polar expeditions.

Photo of the globe
Globe showing New Zealand, Antarctica and Australia

 

The Godwits have landed!

The very first feathered signs of spring arriving have landed in my old home city. Along with the daffodils, the godwits have landed in Christchurch (New Zealand) – arriving from the Alaskan Arctic Tundra where they raise their young.

Christchurch (and a few other places in New Zealand) is where they escape the Alaskan winter and have a summer holiday while feeding up large, building up their weight and strength before heading north again to reproduce.

godwits coming into land on the beach side the Avon-Heathcote estuary

So, in a few months, this annual, epic journey by some 80-thousand Eastern Bar-tailed godwits will migrate back to their breeding grounds.

the sand dunes are alive with bird watchers saying farewell

Their journey – of 11,500 kilometres – usually takes about six days! Its nonstop when they head south while heading north they have a few stopovers in Asia

Christchurch locals farewell them from our shores and when they return the bells peal out to welcome them back to their summer feeding grounds here on the Ihutai/Avon-Heathcote estuary such a short distance the centre of our city.

NZ’s Government House, Wellington

little girl was queen for the day

Yesterday my Monday morning walking group joined a public tour of New Zealand’s Government House.  (Check their website to book a tour )

This was my first visit there as when public events have been on I have missed out because of number restrictions or have had other engagements on. We all enjoyed it and intend making a booking for just our group to visit the gardens in particular.

I will blog about Government House (1910) and our Governor-General’s later but for today, here are a few photos of the beautiful gardens.

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