Happy Suffrage Day New Zealand – 19th September

web KATE detailHappy anniversary to New Zealand – and tomorrow morning (19th Sept) I’m attending a breakfast at Te Papa  (Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa) to celebrate, and commemorate the women who fought for the right to vote – and look to the future too no doubt.

It’s 123 years since the woman of New Zealand, our wonderful suffragists, our early feminists, won us the ability to vote in our general Parliamentary elections. Some, but certainly not all, women had been able to vote in various non-Parliamentary elections.

Female ratepayers, that is landowners, had been voting in local body elections from 1875; two years later they could stand for school committees, then in 1893, after years of campaigning, New Zealand women, whether landowners or not, became able to vote in the national Parliamentary elections.

Annual celebrations in Christchurch 19th Sept
Annual celebrations in Christchurch 19th Sept

Our suffragists certainly led the way, with the USA, in the face of most states allowing it, granted the same right to their women in 1920 (19th amendment) then, in 1928 all women in Britain were able to vote: before that, from 1918 only female property owners over 30-yrs had been able to vote.

Given our history I get upset at the lack of knowledge by a wide swathe of New Zealand, including the media, using the term suffragette to refer to our suffragists.

That term was coined about 15 years after New Zealand women were voting therefore New Zealand women were not suffragettes. First used in a newspaper it was a derogatory term but eventually was captured by the women of the USA and UK but was and never should be used in relationship to Kate Shepherd and our women ancestors, including my maternal great-grandmother, Elizabeth Rowe: my grandmother, Mabel was born in 1893 so it has always been easy to remember both dates!

One of the great things about the 1893 Electoral Bill was that while Māori women were given the vote too not ‘just’ women with land, unfortunately,  Chinese women, in fact all Chinese, did not get the vote until the early 1950s.

Suffrage day (19th November) is often also called White Camellia day, as women who supported enfranchisement wore a white camellia.

The Christchurch memorial was unveiled at the 100-year anniversary and a new camellia variety was created and named ‘Kate Sheppard’.

Don’t waste the courage and strength of our brave 19th century women by honouring them and making sure you always vote – it was a hard won battle, albeit very different to those in the UK in particular. 


Rutherford – local boy celebrated in Christchurch’s Arts Centre

As a pioneer of his time, it’s only fitting that cutting-edge technology is used to tell his story, said Christchurch Arts Centre CEO, André Lovatt. “We’ve carefully kept the beautiful heritage features but have injected the space with new energy by using state-of-the-art storytelling techniques that will appeal to people of all ages.

webuse rutherfords den chch 2016 (26)

The original Lecture Theatre is exactly as it was – graffiti and all – which adults will love as this was how the ‘den’ was until the quake shook Christchurch (2010) and many buildings have had to be strengthened. The Arts Centre has had major work done too. It was great to sit in the old lecture theatre just as I, and my kids, have done for years. Well, it’s the same . . .  until the digital screen at the front starts playing a movie commissioned by the Arts Centre. A great example of the saying ‘same same but different.’

I spot the host of the 5 star Classic Villa checking out the den too
I spot the host – from the across the road, 5 star, Classic Villa checking out the den too

webuse rutherfords den chch 2016 (12)

Much of what Rutherford discovered all this years ago, in what was really an old cloakroom, led to the technology of today and now visitors can learn about the old with the new, in fun and exciting ways.

For more than a century, the Arts Centre site was home to Canterbury College and from 1890 one of its students was Rutherford. He was a regular Kiwi who became known as the father of nuclear physics and in 1908 was awarded the Nobel Prize in ChemistrySee more about the Den here

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the kiwitravelwriter and Sam Mahon's FOOL
The kiwitravelwriter with Sam Mahon’s FOOL Feb 2016

See more I’ve written about the Den here http://wp.me/pc3Zw-382




Hot air ballooning makes me fall in love

I’m reposting this as this is a great way to see the Canterbury Plains and Southern Alps. It was originally printed in the Christchurch Press – I hope you enjoy it.

KiwiTravelWriter talks food, travel, and tips

“When the wind blows in your face, something different is about to happen,” we’re told.It’s true and when the wind blows on our faces we change direction during the best morning I’ve had for ages. Infact it is so good I’m in love – in love with hot air ballooning. It is such fun even clichés fail me.

At 4 30am I was woken with a phone call. “It’s on, the weather is perfect, and your transport will be at your door in 20 minutes.It takes an hour to reach Methven, (1025 ft above sea level) home of Aoraki Balloon Safaris and close to Mt Hutt ski fields – and also on the Lord of the Rings route, a nearly a New Zealand-long-trail.Meeting with others who have driven from Christchurch or stayed overnight, we’re given overshoes, have our names and weights recorded and divided into two…

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Lord Rutherford: father of nuclear physics

Scientific discovery and hands-on experimentation takes centre stage at the state-of-the-art Rutherford’s Den in the Arts Centre, Christchurch, where New Zealand scientist Ernest, Lord Rutherford started his scientific career in these very rooms.

A million dollars in $NZ100 bills
A million dollars in $NZ100 bills

Rutherford, the moustached man on the $NZ100 note, discovered what the inside of an atom looks like, found out about radioactivity, discovered and named alpha and beta particles, and was the first scientist to change one element into another. As a pioneer of his time, it’s only fitting that cutting-edge technology is being used to tell his story, says Arts Centre CEO André Lovatt.

“We’ve carefully kept the beautiful heritage features but have injected the space with new energy by using state-of-the-art storytelling techniques that will appeal to people of all ages.

“You can literally step inside an exhibition that illustrates what atoms are, or use your own movements to learn about renewable energy sources. In the actual space where Rutherford conducted his research on radio waves, there’s a projection of him that includes original voice recordings – making you feel as though you’re in the same room as him.”

A bad selfie of me with Andre Lovat
A bad selfie of me with Andre Lovat

The original Lecture Theatre is exactly as it was – graffiti and all – until the digital screen at the front starts playing a movie that was commissioned by the Arts Centre.

“So much of what Rutherford discovered led to the technology we enjoy today and we want visitors to learn about this in fun and exciting ways. We want it to be a place where people of all backgrounds are inspired to believe that everyone has the potential to achieve greatness.”

Before the earthquakes, Rutherford’s Den was popular with locals, tourists and schools that participated in its curriculum-linked education programme and the popular education sessions are now once again being offered on-site at the Arts Centre. Bookings, and further information can be found on www.rutherfordsden.org.nz

Rutherford’s Den is located in the Arts Centre’s historic Clock Tower building at 2 Worcester Boulevard, adjacent to the Great Hall that re-opened in June.

For more than a century, the Arts Centre site was home to Canterbury College and from 1890 one of its students was Rutherford. He was a regular Kiwi who became known as the father of nuclear physics and in 1908 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

The reopening of Rutherford’s Den is a significant milestone in the staged re-opening of the Arts Centre and I will post more about the new-look den next week.

In spring the adjacent North Quadrangle and Library will be accessible once again, along with a number of new cafés and food outlets. By the end of 2016, almost half the site will again be open to the public.

Passing The Arts Centre
Tram passing the Arts Centre

A Sunday afternoon in Christchurch

A few images from a lovely afternoon in Christchurch, New Zealand. (taken on my phone)

Christchurch Art Gallery reflects me and old villas
Hard to see, but a few godwits feed after recently arriving for their summer feed fest (from Alaska)
Yellow wattle and blue skies at The Columbo shopping centre
the award-winning cafe Hello Sunday in an old church. Beside The Columbo



Entrance to Rutherford’s Den. Christchurch Arts Centre


Christchurch Art Gallery – a must visit



Xiamen library (Fujian,China) is huge, and amazing

Fujian province, China, is unknown to most Western travellers but is the most famous and perhaps the most visited area for local tourism.

‘Secretive and reclusive’ were terms often used about China but things are changing.

You will know it’s home to chopsticks, calligraphy, acupuncture, the Silk Road, and Tiananmen Square, and of course the Chinese invented paper, printing, gunpowder and the umbrella.

Xiamen, the city by the sea, is at the mouth of the Nine Dragon River, and has frequently been labelled one of China’s most beautiful cities. It’s also been called a garden on the sea and is consistently named one of China’s most liveable cities, and was once called Amoy by Westerners. The climate is subtropical, and as it is on the coast and with very little heavy industry, and no coal for domestic heating, it’s here is cleaner than most Chinese cities.

This island city, opposite Taiwan, has been an important trading port since the Song Dynasty 960 until 1279 and was a seaport open to foreign trade. The Portuguese with the first European traders in 1541. It is still an important trading place especially as it was one of the first four special economic zones in 1981.

During my week in the area we visited their amazing library which had originally been a foundry. It retains the huge features of such a building and has been converted amazingly.

Follow my footsteps on our trip via this slide show.

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Te Papa Press is an award winning press so check them out.

NOTE: I travelled in this region as part of a cultural delegation from Xiamen’s sister city Wellington, New Zealand. See more here – http://www.wellingtonxiamen.com and check #Xiamen for photos on Instagram.

Which is your Buddha? (Thai Buddhist traditions)

I was told, in Thailand, that Buddha spent seven days following his enlightenment thinking about the suffering of all living creatures, and Thai people now believe that their day of birth reflects their life.

Seven Buddha images show each day of those days, except Wednesday which has two, morning and afternoon-evening.

So, one year, while in Thailand, I bought Buddha’s that matched that day for each of my immediate family as their Christmas gifts. You may like to check your day of birth and which Buddha is associated with you.

Here are photos that show the various postures for that days – I need to point out that some temples had different poses for some days!

left Sunday, middle Monday. right Tuesday


Left Thursday (my day) middle Friday, right Saturday

These photos are not good as were taken through scratched glass but stay as my reference for the various poses and days as that was when I first heard about them – during a bike ride out from Bangkok.

Thailand also has lucky and unlucky colours for days of the week; the lucky ones are:

  • Sunday: red
  • Monday: yellow
  • Tuesday: pink
  • Wednesday: day Green / night grey
  • Thursday: orange
  • Friday: light blue
  • Saturday: purple sleep

I hope you are happy with your colour and Buddha stance!