Mothers Day gift … or any other day, for anyone else

Heather Hapeta AKA the KiwiTravelWriter, got her first passport and ran away from home on her 50th birthday.

With a backpack, an around the world air ticket, and no other bookings she travelled the world: this book tells of her year of adventures from Alaska to Zimbabwe. It was so good she’s done it twice more and now lives as a travel writer, photographer, and blogger.

Hard copies are available directly from the author (NZ addresses only), and e-versions from Amazon and other e-book retailers.

http://www.kiwitravelwriter.com

KiwiTravelWriter has readers all over the world! Thanks.

Interesting stats (June 2015)  about where my readers have come from – in order of numbers … thanks to you all!

United States
New Zealand
Australia
Malaysia
United Kingdom
Singapore
Canada
India
Fiji
Philippines
South Africa
Japan
Germany
France
Indonesia
European Union
Russia
Switzerland
Spain
Sri Lanka
United Arab Emirates
Israel
Netherlands
Hungary
Mexico
Thailand
Hong Kong SAR China
Belgium
Lebanon
Ireland
Turkey
Norway
Brunei
Denmark
Croatia
Serbia
Dominica
Vietnam

 

culture shock

This article appeals to me as a travel writer – often my biggest culture shock happens in an english-speaking country!

Culture shock is surreptitious. by Jane Lasky 

It shows up in the most unusual ways at  the most unexpected times. Sometimes you’ll be unable to sleep while other times you’ll need to sleep far too much. You may go from angry to  vulnerable in a nanosecond for no apparent reason and you may even wish  you were anywhere but where you happen to be.

But, if you hang in there, those effects will surely fade.

Consider the case of one expatriate.

Out of work and having trouble finding any in the Los Angeles area,  Heidi decided to look elsewhere. As a television executive, this  transplanted Pennsylvanian had made Hollywood a happy home for nearly a  decade. Still, in order to pursue her chosen profession, she was  willing to relocate.

That she did — about 8,000 miles away in MelbourneAustralia.

When the two-year contract came through, Heidi had to move quickly. She  was given a mere month to get there and find her bearings before  reporting to her new job.  READ THE ARTICLE HERE

a river has a name change three times

In 1850, swamp covered Christchurch and settlers had to traverse bog to get home after shopping in the market.

Those early settlers must have been sorely disillusioned when they first saw the soggy land of their dreams.

Between 1000 and 1500, the indigenous Maori (who had arrived here from the Pacific) had a settlement here, called Puari. It stretched east from the Otakaro River, and was home for around 800 Waitaha people who gathered eels, whitebait, native trout, ducks, and flounder here.

The river was renamed the Avvonafter a Scottish river – then this too was changed to Avon, and the first bridge to span the river was a cart bridge in 1852. Ten years later the first public lamp was lit at the same market street bridge but kerosene was considered too expensive and the town lighting project was halted for two years. read further here

Punting the Otakaro, Avvon or Avon Christchurch, NZ
Punting the Otakaro, Avvon or Avon Christchurch, NZ