Matiu Somes Island, Wellington harbour (NZ)

In the middle of Wellington Harbour, New Zealand, is a fabulous island. Easy to visit, by the Dom Post Ferry, I have been there quite often and have even stayed overnight a few times.

Matiu Somes Island is a predator-free scientific and historic reserve with a rich multicultural history.

The island is owned by local iwi (Te Atiawa) following a Treaty (of Waitangi) settlement. It is governed by a Kaitiaki Board – of local Maori and DoC (Dept of Conservation)

Since the mid 1800s, it’s been a quarantine station, for people and animals, and during World War 2 was a prison for non-New Zealand citizens.

I had planned a trip there last week but was unable to go, but because of that its been on my mind so thought I’d post a few photos for you. See a previous post about the island here

Xiamen Sister City BBQ. Wellington

A reunion of our trip to Xiamen, China earlier this year. See some of my many blogs about our exploring.  Wonder if there will be another one …

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A non traditional Chinese BBQ

Xiamen: tea ceremonies in Wellington’s sister city

Wikipedia, that oracle of facts, tells me that we Kiwi are not big tea drinkers: seems we are 45th in the world – way behind Turkey, the Irish and British. The Chinese put it on our culinary world map in the 10th C when they began drying, then steeping, the leaves of the Camellia sinensis.

International Tea Day is December 15 and it seems tea is the most widely used drink  – after water.

On my recent trip to Xiamen, China, (as part of a cultural group from its sister city Wellington, New Zealand) we drank tea daily, often many time daily – many times at tea ceremonies.

Here are just a  few of those tea drinking events.

Note: I travelled to Xiamen as part of a cultural delegation from its sister city Wellington, New Zealand. Thank you for the help for me to take part in this trip.

See more here –www.wellingtonxiamen.com and check #Xiamen for WXA photos on Instagram.

 

Xiamen library (Fujian,China) is huge, and amazing

Fujian province, China, is unknown to most Western travellers but is the most famous and perhaps the most visited area for local tourism.

‘Secretive and reclusive’ were terms often used about China but things are changing.

You will know it’s home to chopsticks, calligraphy, acupuncture, the Silk Road, and Tiananmen Square, and of course the Chinese invented paper, printing, gunpowder and the umbrella.

Xiamen, the city by the sea, is at the mouth of the Nine Dragon River, and has frequently been labelled one of China’s most beautiful cities. It’s also been called a garden on the sea and is consistently named one of China’s most liveable cities, and was once called Amoy by Westerners. The climate is subtropical, and as it is on the coast and with very little heavy industry, and no coal for domestic heating, it’s here is cleaner than most Chinese cities.

This island city, opposite Taiwan, has been an important trading port since the Song Dynasty 960 until 1279 and was a seaport open to foreign trade. The Portuguese with the first European traders in 1541. It is still an important trading place especially as it was one of the first four special economic zones in 1981.

During my week in the area we visited their amazing library which had originally been a foundry. It retains the huge features of such a building and has been converted amazingly.

Follow my footsteps on our trip via this slide show.

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Te Papa Press is an award winning press so check them out.

NOTE: I travelled in this region as part of a cultural delegation from Xiamen’s sister city Wellington, New Zealand. See more here – http://www.wellingtonxiamen.com and check #Xiamen for photos on Instagram.

View from the bus – travels in Xiamen, China

IMG_8770IMG_8770These are not good photos, more just memory joggers for me as I write about my recent travels to Wellington’s sister-city, Xiamen – in Fujian Province, China – so, I hope you enjoy this  unedited slideshow. Check out the other blogs I’ve written and watch for more to come about Xiamen: one of China’s top 10 pretty cities.

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Wellington’s sister city, Xiamen, Fujian,China

IMG_7353IMG_7353Fujian province seems almost unknown to most Western travellers but it’s the most famous – and perhaps China’s most-visited – area for local tourism. Friends are amazed that I’m not visiting the terracotta warriors, the great wall or any of the major cities of this huge country. However, spending more time in one region is, for me, preferable to rushing around to see all the must-see places. That being said, we did have to hurry to see just some of this city and region in a week.

Secretive and reclusive were terms often used about China but things are changing. Home to about one in six of the world’s population it’s not surprising they have embraced consumerism.

You will know it’s home to chopsticks, calligraphy, acupuncture, the Silk Road, and Tiananmen Square, and of course the Chinese invented paper, printing, gunpowder – and the umbrella.

IMG_7348IMG_7348Xiamen, the city by the sea, (or garden city) at the mouth of the Nine Dragon River has often been labelled one of China’s most beautiful cities. It’s also been called a garden on the sea and is consistently named one of China’s most livable cities, and was once called Amoy by Westerners.

The climate is subtropical, and as it is on the coast, with very little heavy industry, and no coal for domestic heating, it’s cleaner than most Chinese cities.

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This island city, which is just opposite Taiwan, has been an important trading port since the Song Dynasty 960 until 1279 and was a seaport open to foreign trade. The Portuguese with the first European traders in 1541. It is still an important trading place especially as it was one of the first four special economic zones in 1981.

Many natives of this area immigrated to Southeast Asia and Taiwan during the 19th and 20th century and in fact, many other overseas Chinese originated from here too – and they love returning home to the land of their fathers for holidays.

More blogs to come will be about: art/artists, temples, food, Gulang Yu island, the Hui’an women, Laojun, Riyuegu hot pools, Little Egrets dancers, and the Nangjing tulou- just to name a few)

NOTE: I travelled in this region as part of a cultural delegation from its sister city Wellington, New Zealand. See more here – www.wellingtonxiamen.com and check #Xiamen for WXA photos on Instagram.

Photos of public art in the Wellington Botanic Gardens, NZ

 

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Grab a free map of the sculpture walk to see these, and many more great pieces of art, Wellington’s Botanic Gardens.

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I took these photos on a recent walk … and thought others may like to see them. Take the cable car from the CBD up to the gardens and wander around these lovely gardens.