Tag: Photos

Encounters with creatures in Udaipur, India

Encounters with creatures in Udaipur, India

In India, architectural heritage is often linked to the major religions of the country: Buddhist stupas and monasteries; Hindu and Jain temples in  many styles – many share structural characteristics such as stone columns and horizontal blocks carved with sacred imagery or decorative motifs sculptures of the vast pantheon of Hindu gods and goddesses are everywhere the various deities have many manifestations which becomes confusing as their names, like many Indian cities, are interchangeable.

Udaipur, Rajasthan, is a fairy-tale city with marble palaces and lakes – and I will blog about them later. In the meantime, here is a slideshow (23 pics) some of the local wildlife.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

Birds, squirrels, and a monkey in New Delhi

Birds, squirrels, and a monkey in New Delhi

With a couple of free days in New Delhi, and having already visited many of the tourist sites on a previous visit this time was pretty laid-back, relaxing before I went to a conference. But first I have to check out the wildlife!

I left my hotel (and will write a blog about all my various and diverse accommodations I used in India later) and went to Lodi Gardens. My Uber driver got lost despite his GPS and when he dropped me off said ‘I was here last weekend and you will see black swans whites swans – they are beautiful.’  I had not imagined what sort of birds or animals I would see in New Delhi so assumed the swans were left over from colonial days.

Here are the photos of the birds and creatures I saw:

. . . as you can see, not a swan in sight!

Away from Lodhi Park I also saw one monkey, and a gaggle of geese at the cricket grounds at a private school.

hiding out only metres from my hotel

Flowers in Lodhi Garden, New Delhi

Flowers in Lodhi Garden, New Delhi

According to Lonely Planet this peaceful Indian garden in New Delhi was originally named after the wife of a British Resident, Lady Willingdon, who apparently had two villages cleared in 1936 to landscape a park to remind her of home!

True or not, today it’s named after the Lodhi-era tombs of the 15th century Bara Gumbad tomb and mosque, as well as tombs of Mohammed Shah and Sikander Lodi, and the Athpula bridge across the lake, which dates from Emperor Akbar’s reign.

The gardens were re-designed in 1968 and are well worth exploring – although it took my Uber driver his GPS and about three lots of directions by taxi drivers to find!

Evidently it’s one of the best jogging parks in Delhi and I saw school groups exploring, photographers, and people practicing yoga and meditation in the peace and quiet.

Later I will make a blog or two of the birds and other things I saw there.

 

 

 

 

 

City hikes in Wellington – my Monday morning walk

If you have followed me  you will know I take city hikes in Wellington – my monday morning walk, and often post photos about that day’s walk. Here is today’s #mondaymorningwalk – my last in Wellington for six weeks, the next one will be in #India.

we took the #20 bus to the top and wandered down. Enjoy the slideshow of our morning.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Another yatra in India – travelling solo you’ll love it or loathe it it seems

Another yatra in India – travelling solo you’ll love it or loathe it it seems

Salt Plains, Gujarat

About ten years ago, the author Christopher Kremer, who, at a book festival I helped organise in Christchurch, New Zealand, signed his book (Inhaling the Mahatma) by saying ‘To Heather, with best wishes on your yatra!’  Christopher, September 06′.

That was just before my first trip to India, and now with my fourth starting soon, I wondered what is it that attracts me to the country – after all, I have family members who find India too intense, too difficult.  Why do people love it or loathe it? Why am I different? And why do people always ask : is it safe to travel alone?’

Yatra means journey and, as a travel writer, for me a journey is not just the places I go – it is also the trip my emotions take – and India takes you on many journeys of the emotions – the highs and the lows.

the author in Haridwar

I loved it, I hated it, I laughed at it, I laughed with it, and I cried about it – confused and sad but ultimately optimistic about this huge country,  an intensely vivid country – the colours, the sounds, the smells, the tastes, the sights (and sites) – which assaults all your senses for good and for bad: and that’s just in the first hour of course.

It continues the whole time you are there.  When you are travelling on your own, such as I usually do, you get 100% of the pain, and of course, a hundred percent of the pleasure.  What you don’t get, is bored.

photo of Narenda Modi
I breakfast with Narenda Modi (then Gujarat’s Chief Minister)

Of course, there is also pollution, and rubbish, nearly everywhere, as well as people desperate to sell you something.  Poverty and richness live side-by-side and it’s devastating to see and hear the beggars.

While I usually don’t give to beggars, I travel sustainably and support small businesses and responsible tourism – instead of waiting for money to ‘trickle down’, wherever possible I spend with small traders – and certainly not with international companies.

On my first trip I travelled from Haridwar, Uttarakhand, in the north then south to Ernakulam in Kerala and of course, Maheshwar on the banks of wonderful Narmada River.  My other Indian yatra have been in Gujarat, home of Gandhi, and which has few tourists – I recommend you go there.  Search on any of these names in my blog and find stories and photos about each of those places.

Let me make a list of just some of the reasons I’m returning on yet another yatra:

  • the people, the food, and the feast of colours, sights and sounds
  • 2000 years of sacred buildings; Buddhist, Hindu, Islāmic, to name just a few
  • Interesting festivals throughout the year
  • There are nine or ten religions in India, and about 33 million gods – I’m bound to stumble over at least one!
  • And maybe, just maybe, when they know I’ve been an extra in the Bollywood movie The Italian Job they may make me a star – or, knowing what happened, they may not!

 

Haridwar – pilgrims get blessings in the Ganges
Navratri festival in Maheshwar
Another beautiful Indian (Gujarat) woman

 

Meditation on the banks of the holy Narmada River, Maheshwar.

 

 

 

 

 

Kota Kinabalu (KK) is an easy place to visit

Kota Kinabalu (KK) is an easy place to visit

If you have not travelled in Asia, both Sabah and Sarawak are easy introductions to the area.  As many of you will know, Malaysia is my favourite Asian country – my recent travels have confirmed it! KK and Kuching are great places to start.

On my trip in July-August I stayed at the Hilton ( read about it here) while on other travels to KK I’ve stayed at what my friend named as ‘CCC’s’ – cheap, cheerful and comfortable’s.

One of the must-do in any Asian city is visiting the market, and yes, I do have meals in them!

Here are a few pictures to whet your appetite for travel in Malaysian Borneo – which is a fabulous, ideally placed ‘stop-over destination” to break your trip between hemispheres.,

Search on KK, Kota Kinabalu, or Sabah – in this blog – to see other pieces I’ve written about this delightful part of the world.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

NZ’s Government House, Wellington

little girl was queen for the day

Yesterday my Monday morning walking group joined a public tour of New Zealand’s Government House.  (Check their website to book a tour )

This was my first visit there as when public events have been on I have missed out because of number restrictions or have had other engagements on. We all enjoyed it and intend making a booking for just our group to visit the gardens in particular.

I will blog about Government House (1910) and our Governor-General’s later but for today, here are a few photos of the beautiful gardens.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Great day for a walk in Wellington, New Zealand 

My Monday morning walk produced lots of great sights … we went up the cable car to the botanic gardens, had coffee and walked back into the city.

Back in the city there were events in Civic Square to celebrate Māori Language week – Te Wiki o te Māori , so I bought a hangi for tonight’s dinner . . .

. . . and then, walking back up Cuba Street I spotted my local Green MP (James Shaw) being interviewed about mental health issues and the need for an inquiry into past wrongs.